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Preaching the Blessed Light

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“Courage,” the disciples say, “He is calling you!”  This joyous message first given to the blind Batimaeus greatly encourages us friars, who ourselves have heard it as we now preach to others.  The Lord’s voice is clear and resounds in every human person; he cannot be ignored!

We friars pray your time is well spent reading over what we show you here. May it lead you to consider speaking with one of us soon about your future, on which God’s will has already been stamped.  Choose freely what God has chosen for you!

The great courage to be shown as you discern your vocation will be called on every day, but it will be your highest honour and most abundant joy, and so, your salvation for the eternal life.

Fr Paul Rowse, OP

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Experience Dominican Life

  • Come and See Weekends

    'Come and See' Weekends are a great opportunity to get a feel for what the Dominicans are about, how we live our lives, how we pray, and why each of us joined the Order of Preachers. It is a great opportunity to get a deeper understanding of religious life in general and in particular our way of living it through the charism of our founder, St Dominic. Our next 'Come and See' weekend is in Sydney, NSW: 

    In this Year of Consecrated Life, the Sydney Dominican Priory will be holding a Come and See Discernment Day for young men on April 25th. Join us as we commemorate ANZAC Day with talks on vocational discernment in general, on religious life in all its various flavours, as well as personal testimonies from a Dominican priest and brother. Accommodation is available for those wishing to fly in from interstate. For more information or to register, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

     

     

    If you are interested in spending a weekend with our communities in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, or Adelaide, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You are most welcome!

     

Ask the Vocations Director

  • Contact us!

    Fr. Thomas Azzi is a priest of the Dominican Order. A graduate of the University of Sydney having studied commerce and law, Fr. Thomas joined the Dominican Order in 2007. His formation has seen him assigned to Brisbane, Hong Kong, Adelaide, Melbourne and now Sydney where he was ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Anthony Fisher in June, 2014. Fr. Thomas is chaplain to the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) as well as Sancta Sophia College, a residential College of the University of Sydney. He is also the Provincial Promoter of Vocations for the Dominicans.

     email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Order of preachers

Saint of the Day

CNA - Saint of the Day

CNA
  • On April 27 the Catholic Church honors Saint Zita, a 13th century Italian woman whose humble and patient service to God has made her a patron saint of maids and other domestic workers.Born into poverty during the early 1200s, Zita was taught by her mother from an early age to seek God's will in all circumstances. She had already developed a strong prayer life by the time she was sent, at age 12, to work in the home of the Fatinelli family in Lucca.Zita's employers lived near a church where she managed – by waking up extremely early in the morning – to attend daily Mass. She looked upon her work primarily as a means of serving God, and kept herself mindful of his presence during long hours of exhausting tasks.Her presence in the Fatinelli household, however, was inexplicably unwelcome and met with harsh treatment for a number of years. Zita suffered hostility and abuse from her employers, including fits of rage and beatings.The young woman faced these trials with patience and inner strength developed through a life of prayer. In time, the members of the household came to value her service, and appreciate the virtues she had acquired through God's grace.Zita maintained her humility when she was promoted to a position of responsibility within the Fatinelli home. She continued to view her earthly responsibilities as a service to God, and to seek his presence through prayer and fasting. She also refused to hold a grudge against those who once mistreated her.Within her new household role, Zita was faithful to Christ's admonition that superiors should conduct themselves as the servants of all. She was kind to those under her direction, and mindful of the poor through frequent almsgiving to the point of personal sacrifice.Throughout her life, Zita found a source of strength and consolation in the Mass and Holy Communion, which frequently moved her to tears. Despite her many responsibilities, she frequently set aside time to recall God's presence through contemplative prayer in the course of the day.After foretelling her own death and spiritually preparing for it, Saint Zita died in Lucca on April 27, 1271. Many residents regarded her as a saint and began to seek her intercession, to which a large number of miracles were attributed. Some writers even began referring to the city of Lucca as “Santa Zitaâ€� in her honor.The Fatinelli family, which had once caused St. Zita such extreme suffering, eventually contributed to the cause of her canonization. The earliest account of her life was found in a manuscript belonging to the family, and published in 1688.The Church's liturgical veneration of St. Zita was introduced in the early 1500s, and confirmed by Pope Innocent XII in 1696. In 1580, her body was exhumed and found to be miraculously incorrupt. It is venerated today in the Basilica of St. Frediano, where she attended Mass during her life.