Home
Province of Australia and New Zealand
Preaching the Blessed Light

Welcome

“Courage,” the disciples say, “He is calling you!”  This joyous message first given to the blind Batimaeus greatly encourages us friars, who ourselves have heard it as we now preach to others.  The Lord’s voice is clear and resounds in every human person; he cannot be ignored!

We friars pray your time is well spent reading over what we show you here. May it lead you to consider speaking with one of us soon about your future, on which God’s will has already been stamped.  Choose freely what God has chosen for you!

The great courage to be shown as you discern your vocation will be called on every day, but it will be your highest honour and most abundant joy, and so, your salvation for the eternal life.

Fr Paul Rowse, OP

  • Register

Latest News

Experience Dominican Life

  • Come and See Weekends

    'Come and See' Weekends are a great opportunity to get a feel for what the Dominicans are about, how we live our lives, how we pray, and why each of us joined the Order of Preachers. It is a great opportunity to get a deeper understanding of religious life in general and in particular our way of living it through the charism of our founder, St Dominic. Our next 'Come and See' weekend is in Sydney, NSW: 

    In this Year of Consecrated Life, the Sydney Dominican Priory will be holding a Come and See Discernment Day for young men on April 25th. Join us as we commemorate ANZAC Day with talks on vocational discernment in general, on religious life in all its various flavours, as well as personal testimonies from a Dominican priest and brother. Accommodation is available for those wishing to fly in from interstate. For more information or to register, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

     

     

    If you are interested in spending a weekend with our communities in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, or Adelaide, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You are most welcome!

     

Ask the Vocations Director

  • Contact us!

    Fr. Thomas Azzi is a priest of the Dominican Order. A graduate of the University of Sydney having studied commerce and law, Fr. Thomas joined the Dominican Order in 2007. His formation has seen him assigned to Brisbane, Hong Kong, Adelaide, Melbourne and now Sydney where he was ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Anthony Fisher in June, 2014. Fr. Thomas is chaplain to the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) as well as Sancta Sophia College, a residential College of the University of Sydney. He is also the Provincial Promoter of Vocations for the Dominicans.

     email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

OP News

Order of preachers

Saint of the Day

CNA - Saint of the Day

CNA
  • An Italian Benedictine monk who became the “Apostle of the English,â€� Saint Augustine of Canterbury is honored by the Catholic Church on May 27. Under the direction of Pope Saint Gregory the Great, Augustine founded the famous See of Canterbury and preached the Catholic faith to the country's Anglo-Saxon pagans during the late sixth and early seventh centuries. He is not be confused with the earlier St. Augustine of Hippo, the famous author of the “Confessionsâ€� and “City of God.â€� Augustine's date of birth cannot be established, nor are any details of his early life known. Most likely born in Rome, to a noble family, he entered monastic life as a young man. The community he joined had been recently founded by a Benedictine monk named Gregory, who would go on to become Pope and eventually be known as St. Gregory the Great. The friendship between Gregory and Augustine had great historical consequences, as it was the Pope who would eventually send his fellow monk to evangelize England. Around 595, five years into his 14-year pontificate, Pope Gregory set to work on a plan for the conversion of the English people. The Catholic faith had already been preached and accepted among England's original Celtic inhabitants, in earlier times; but from the mid-fifth century onward, the country was dominated by Anglo-Saxon invaders who did not accept Christianity, and were not converted by the small number of isolated Celtic Christian holdouts. Thus, England largely had to be evangelized anew. For this task the Pope chose a group of around forty monks – including Augustine, who was to represent the delegation and communicate on its behalf. Though he was not explicitly chosen as its leader at that time, that was the role he ended up taking on with Gregory’s support. The group left for England in June 596, but some of the missionaries lost their nerve after hearing fearsome reports about the Anglo-Saxons. Augustine ended up returning to Rome, where he got further advice and support from the Pope. Persuaded to continue on their way, the missionary-monks reached their port of departure and set sail for England in spring of 597. After arriving they gained an audience with King Ethelbert of Kent, a pagan ruler whose Frankish wife Queen Bertha was a Christian. Speaking with the king through an interpreter, Augustine gave a powerful and straightforward presentation of the Gospel message, speaking of Christ’s redemption of the world and his offer of eternal life. Ethelbert would later convert, and eventually even be canonized as a saint. But his initial response to Augustine’s preaching was only mildly positive: he would receive the missionaries with hospitality, and permit them to evangelize without any restriction. Despite his early ambivalence, however, the king became a generous patron of the monks. They made their home in Canterbury, after dramatically entering the city in procession with the Cross and an image of Christ. The Canterbury community lived according to the Rule of St. Benedict, as they had in Italy, but they also preached in the surrounding area...