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Preaching the Blessed Light

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“Courage,” the disciples say, “He is calling you!”  This joyous message first given to the blind Batimaeus greatly encourages us friars, who ourselves have heard it as we now preach to others.  The Lord’s voice is clear and resounds in every human person; he cannot be ignored!

We friars pray your time is well spent reading over what we show you here. May it lead you to consider speaking with one of us soon about your future, on which God’s will has already been stamped.  Choose freely what God has chosen for you!

The great courage to be shown as you discern your vocation will be called on every day, but it will be your highest honour and most abundant joy, and so, your salvation for the eternal life.

Fr Paul Rowse, OP

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  • 'Come and See' Days

    'Come and See' Days are a great opportunity to get a feel for what the Dominicans are about, how we live our lives, how we pray, and why each of us joined the Order of Preachers. It is a great opportunity to get a deeper understanding of religious life in general and in particular our way of living it through the charism of our founder, St Dominic. Our next 'Come and See' Day is in Sydney, NSW: 

    In this Year of Consecrated Life, the Dominican Friars in Sydney will team up with the Dominican Sisters of St. Cecilia for a Dominican Sydney Day on August 1st at the University of Notre Dame, Sydney. The theme of the day is 'Dominican Saints and Sinner' looking at the great figures which have shaped Dominican life over the last 800 years. For more information or to register, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

     

     

    ALL WELCOME!

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    Fr. Thomas Azzi is a priest of the Dominican Order. A graduate of the University of Sydney having studied commerce and law, Fr. Thomas joined the Dominican Order in 2007. His formation has seen him assigned to Brisbane, Hong Kong, Adelaide, Melbourne and now Sydney where he was ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Anthony Fisher in June, 2014. Fr. Thomas is chaplain to the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) as well as Sancta Sophia College, a residential College of the University of Sydney. He is also the Provincial Promoter of Vocations for the Dominicans.

     email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Saint of the Day

CNA - Saint of the Day

CNA
  • A statesman and bishop under the Merovingians, St. Arnulf was born in 580 and died in 640. His parents belonged to a distinguished Frankish family, and lived in Austrasia in the eastern section of the kingdom founded by Clovis. IIn the school where Arnulf was placed as a boy, he excelled through his talent and his good behaviour. According to the custom of the age, he was sent in due time to the court of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia (595-612), to be initiated in the various branches of the government. Under the guidance of Gundulf, the Mayor of the Palace, he soon became so proficient that he was placed on the regular list of royal officers, and among the first of the kings ministers. He distinguished himself both as a military commander as well as in the civil administration, and at one time he had six distinct provinces under his care. In due course, Arnulf was married to a Frankish woman of noble lineage, by whom he had two sons; Anseghisel and Clodulf. While Arnulf was enjoying worldly emoluments and honours, he did not forget higher and spiritual things. His thoughts often dwelt on monasteries, and with his friend Romaricus, also an officer of the court, he planned to make a pilgrimage to the Abbey of Lérins, evidently for the purpose of devoting his life to God. However, in the meantime the Episcopal See of Metz became vacant. Arnulf was universally designated as a worthy candidate for the office, and he was consecrated bishop of that see around 611. In his new position he set the example of a virtuous life to his subjects, and attended to matters of ecclesiastical government. In 625 he took part in a council held by the Frankish bishops at Reims. With all these different activities, Arnulf still retained his station at the court of the king, and played a prominent role in the national life of his people. In 613, after the death of Theodebert, he, with Pepin of Landen and other nobles, called to Austrasia Clothaire II, King of Neustria. When, in 625, the realm of Austrasia was entrusted to the kings son Dagobert, Arnulf became not only the tutor, but also the chief minister, of the young king. At the time of the estrangement between the two kings in 625 Arnulf, with other bishops and nobles, tried to bring about a reconciliation, but Arnulf dreaded the responsibilities of the episcopal office, and grew weary of court life. About the year 626 he obtained the appointment of a successor to the Episcopal See of Metz, and he and his friend Romaricus withdrew to a solitary place in the mountains of the Vosges. There he lived in communion with God until his death. His remains, interred by Romaricus, were transferred about a year afterwards, by Bishop Goeric, to the basilica of the Holy Apostles in Metz.